Tag Archives: Dog

Spray that Again

Holiday season has begun. This week Scary Boss Lady was off for her summer break. Just in case we were thinking of having a wild party with the Dechra rep who had made an appointment to come and tell us about their range of skin products, she left her daughters Ena and Sara in charge. Tornado Tawse was also presiding over the nursing duties and therefore the whole clinic was a hive of efficiency. Four pallets of pet food arrived at lunchtime on Thursday and within about ten seconds, the entire delivery had been redistributed onto the shelves. Before I knew it on Thursday, all the rooms had been cleaned. Luckily Gerd and Irene had booked me in some cases to see, otherwise I might actually have been at something of a loss for what to do.

One of the cases was desperately sad. A cat had been attacked by a dog and its injuries were serious enough that it had to be put to sleep. There was a little girl there. It is so difficult watching a child having to say goodbye to a loved pet. At the other end of the spectrum, Magne and I performed surgery on a lovely Cavalier King Charles spaniel for pyometra (infection in the uterus). Without our intervention, she would very likely have died. It was a pleasuritself to operate with Magne. This is the second time we have worked together on an uncomplicated pyometra and everything just clicked into place both times. It’s a delicate operation that requires nimble fingers and great care and the process itself was intensely satisfying, but the end result, when the dog comes round safely and greets its owner is the best feeling there is.

Due to the efficiency drive I mentioned above, I did have time to pop in and out of the dental room where Wivek and then Jan-Arne were working. Wivek was enormously helpful with the injured cat and so I was keen to do all I could to help her in return. Obviously she is much better than me at the actual work, but I was able to fetch things that she wanted. Jan-Arne was on good form as usual, telling me how simple Norwegian was. After all, he explained, there were very few words and some of them sounded exactly the same as each other. Prayers, beans and farmers are all pronounced in the same way, he said. At this point, he was about to set to with the ultrasonic descaler. His foot, he thought was not quite on the floor-pedal that operates it and so he reached out with his toe to pull it towards him. It was only when the instrument sent a jet of water right into my mouth that he realised that actually his foot had been on it the whole time. At least that was his excuse anyway. Personally I think it’s odd that that jet was pointed so accurately at my face. If I now come down with some awful cat-tooth disease, I know who is to blame.

The Dechra rep I mentioned at the beginning turned up late. He was meant to arrive at two thirty with lunch and so by two thirty five, everyone in the clinic was sitting in the staff room with bright expectant faces. For some reason, he had called into the clinic in the morning with boxes of sweets for everyone and as the clock ticked onwards, it seemed more and more likely that we were actually going to lunch on forty eight chocolate hearts and seven slightly-worse-for-wear grapes that someone had found lurking at the back of the fridge. However, at three pm, he finally arrived clutching a bag of seven enormous sandwiches to be split between the eight of us who were present. Looking around the table for someone to deal with this delicate situation, Gerd, officially recognising my superior surgical skills asked me if I could dissect each baguette into two. Sadly nobody had thought to tell the rep that Jacqueline was vegetarian and so she was left removing pieces of chicken to leave her with a lettuce and dressing salad. Hungry as ever, Jan-Arne demanded that she hand over the meat. Oddly though, when we later offered him the massed bits of cucumber, mayonnaise and chicken that had fallen from Ena’s sandwich and the slice of lemon that I had removed from mine, he seemed strangely to have lost his appetite.

The afternoon ended with Jaqueline delightedly swapping her Toffifee pack for a box of Sara’s chocolate hearts. Rarely have I seen such a pleased look on her face. Magne had to make do with the enormous pile of leaflets and pamphlets that the Dechra rep had left. For some reason, when I suggested he could take them home for a bit of light holiday reading, he seemed less enthusiastic. Anyone watching might easily have been fooled into thinking that really we clinic staff were actually more interested in the food than in the important information about what drugs the man was trying to sell. As if we were both hungry AND shallow people. Obviously though, as all of you kind people that read my blog know only too well, that could never be the case. Thanks for reading.

Today’s photo is Billy, who was in to see Wivek for some blood tests.

Heartwarming

We do get asked some bizarre questions now and then. This weeks prize goes to one of Jan-Arne’s clients, who wanted to know whether we could do a test to see if his dog was gay as he had failed to show interest when presented with a bitch in heat. Although he was almost certain, Jan-Arne, conscientious to the last, came to check with me and invited me into the room to look at the patient. Of course, there was nothing significant to find.

‘He just doesn’t like women,’ his owner commented to me after I had checked out his pet’s (entirelly normal) testes. It crossed my mind to reply that his dog seemed to like me perfectly well, but he seemed like a lovely man and he had been kind enough to speak in English after all (one of only two non-British clients who chose that path this week).

‘Some men just don’t.’ I replied with a shrug. ‘It’s nothing to worry about.’ Of course, it may be that given another bitch, his dog might change his mind. Love can be a fickle thing.

It has been a week of contrasts and working every day this week has meant I played a full part in all the drama at both ends of the spectrum. It is often the case that when a very old pet is reaching the end of its natural life, there comes a time when it needs a great deal of care. Sometimes just how much is brought home to an owner when they are faced with the decision of how to find someone to take responsibility for their animal during the vacation. It isn’t always possible. Even if you choose to take a holiday where your pet goes on your journey with you, it isn’t always suitable for an animal that is nearing the end of its life to travel at all and sometimes difficult decisions have to be made. The contrast to this has been seen in the number of kittens I have seen this week which have been found and adopted by their finders. The real generosity of some of our pet owners is deeply heart warming.

There was no sad ending for Ludwig, a delightful young Cairn terrier. Ludwig first arrived at the clinic on a Sunday evening, vomiting and in agony. After initially thinking that his pain was abdominal, Marita quickly discovered that poor Ludwig was actually suffering from a testicular torsion. He was given strong pain-killers and his excruciating condition was resolved by careful castration of the affected testicle.

To Marita’s delight, when he returned on Tuesday, as soon as Ludwig saw her across the waiting room, he  launched himself towards her and greeted her with delight. It has often been a source of rueful irony to me, that having loved animals enough to become a vet,  so many of them regard me with at best, suspicion and at worst, fear and dislike.  The only times I have seen this truly reversed was in the emergency clinic. It happened enough to convince me that when an animal comes into the clinic in real genuine pain, and you are the person who gives them relief, then there is no doubt that they feel grateful. I think anyone experiencing this would be left in no doubt of the complex nature of a dog’s consciousness.

I asked Ludwig’s owner if I could take his photo for my blog, and as he was too busy sniffing around the consulting room to pose, Marita picked him up for a cuddle. He immediately took advantage of the situation by kissing her most enthusiastically. Despite the fact that Marita likes him very much indeed, I’m not sure she enjoyed the experience as much as he did.IMG_6515

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_6516IMG_6514Still, understandably, she was both happy, and delighted with his reaction. There are few things better than knowing you have done a great job, especially when the result is seeing a lovely young animal make a full and happy recovery. If they like you as well, that really is the icing on the cake.

 

Todays featured image is of Turbo Trine, Irene’s lovely dog, who had been in to have her teeth cleaned.

 

Buzzing!

Spring is arriving here at last. Marian and I have finally managed to find some time for walking. As you can see from the picture at the top of the page, Bijke came too.

We took the Vestlandske Hovedsvei as it isn’t too far from home.

I actually only started taking photographs when we reached the top of the hill and sat down for coffee . . . here . . .

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I always find this landscape hard to photograph. It’s very rough terrain, but the horizon is flat. As you can see, everything is still winter brown.

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Bijke seemed to be enjoying the sunshine.

We sat for quite a while. The sun is beginning to have some real warmth. While we were sitting on top of the hill, I could hear a skylark singing.

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As we walked down this hill, there was a ringing sound in my ears.

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Not such a good photo because she was a long way away, but we did find the source of the soothing clank clank . That is one of the sounds of summer here.

As we passed by a rocky stream, above the rushing water, frogs were croaking out their spring song.

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Anyone want to live in this house? I know I do. Note the grass roof.

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Almost back at the car, our footsteps were arrested beside this tree.

It wasn’t the sight of it that caused us to stop and take a closer look. The tree was humming.

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Bees! There were thousands of them. I’ve never heard anything like it. I can see two in this photo alone.

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And then we were back at the car in the farmland at the bottom of the valley where it’s possible to grow crops.

I’m off to Yorkshire on Thursday. I’m hoping for sunshine and lambs. Not sure when I’ll be able to blog again (I’m not back until Monday) but I hope while I’m there to do some research for Christmas at Mistletoe Cottage.